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Many projects have contributed funding and support to EgoWeb development. This page provides a history of key developmental milestones and funding sources that made achieving these milestones possible.

2003

Florida Biomedical Research Foundation

Development of EgoWeb was enabled by the availability of the software EgoNet on open source software sharing platforms. Initial funding for EgoNet came from the Florida Biomedical Research Foundation on a grant titled, "A Web-based Egocentric Network Tool for Visualizing Social Influences on Smoking Behavior". Christopher McCarty was the PI of the grant.

2007

The first version of EgoWeb was a modification of to the open source personal/egocentric network data collection java-based software EgoNet, which was uploaded to the file sharing system SourceForge by Chris McCarty at the University of Florida in 2009.

Egonet was uploaded to the code sharing site github.com on Aug 12, 2007. Egonet is written in Java. EgoNet is open source software, licensed under GPL. Development of Egonet is led by McCarty and Martin Smith.

EgoWeb (1.0)

2009-2010

In 2009, researchers at the RAND Corporation began the process of further developing Egonet, eventually branching off into EgoWeb. EgoWeb expanded EgoNet’s capabilities to include enhanced skip logic, a wider variety of question presentations and the ability to run through a web browser.

R01HD059307

It was first modified from Egonet and used to collect egocentric data on a study of HIV risk among heterosexual homeless men (R01HD059307; Suzanne Wenzel PI). EgoWeb development was led by a team of researchers, including David Kennedy, Hank Green, Ryan Brown, and Sam Wertheimer. Programming was conducted by Eric Lavigne and Cambridge Web Design. In June 2010, EgoWeb was installed on laptops and used to collect over 300 egocentric interviews with homeless men recruited at meal lines in Los Angeles’ Skid Row.

R21MH8729

EgoWeb was next used in Uganda (R21MH8729; Wagner PI) to identify HIV-positive individuals at risk for being stigmatized and to develop interventions to help them cope effectively with stigma during treatment. The study also contributed to egocentric network methods development through a comparison of participants’ perceptions with alters’ reports and found support for the validity and accuracy of personal network measures, including participants’ perceptions of alters’ serostatus.

RC2MD004770, R01DA033362,

In 2014, researchers on the UCLA RISE-UP project collaboratively developed EgoWeb 2.0, a PHP-based webserver application to facilitate interviewer-assisted interviews using iPads tablets and respondent-driven surveys over the web with email recruitment invitations. Researchers have continued to enhance EgoWeb 2.0 to enable collection of data on Android tablets and local installations on laptop computers.

R01DA033280; Green PI

Added whole network capabilities, participant roster, improved user interface, web interviewing with unique url - participant id link

The initial version of EgoWeb, which, like EgoNet, was a java application capable of being run on a laptop to collect data in field settings, was more extensively developed across several large sample studies of social networks, Substance Use, and sexual risk behavior among high school students (RC2MD004770, R01DA033362; Wong PI). These projects enabled the improvement of the EgoWeb database, interviewing performance, and user interface; improved webserver capabilities; offline mobile data collection with iPads.

Initial funding for EgoNet came from the Florida Biomedical Research Foundation on a grant titled, "A Web-based Egocentric Network Tool for Visualizing Social Influences on Smoking Behavior". Christopher Mccarty was the PI of the grant.

Other projects that have used EgoWeb

R01MD003964

EgoWeb was used measure longitudinal social networks to track the spread of HIV-related mistrust through HIV-positive African Americans’ networks and their networks’ influence on treatment behaviors (R01MD003964; Bogart PI).



Many projects have contributed funding and support to EgoWeb development. This page provides a history of key developmental milestones and funding sources that made achieving these milestones possible.



2003



EgoNet



Development of EgoWeb was enabled by the availability of the software EgoNet on open source software sharing platforms. Initial funding for EgoNet came from the Florida Biomedical Research Foundation on a grant titled, "A Web-based Egocentric Network Tool for Visualizing Social Influences on Smoking Behavior". Christopher Mccarty was the PI of the grant.





The first version of EgoWeb was a modification to the open source personal/egocentric network data collection java-based software EgoNet, which was uploaded to the file sharing system SourceForge by Chris McCarty at the University of Florida in 2009.













2007



Egonet was uploaded to the code sharing site github.com on Aug 12, 2007. Egonet is written in Java. EgoNet is open source software, licensed under GPL. Development of Egonet is led by McCarty and Martin Smith.



EgoWeb (1.0)



2009-2010



In 2009, researchers at the RAND Corporation began the process of further developing Egonet, eventually branching off into EgoWeb. EgoWeb expanded EgoNet’s capabilities to include enhanced skip logic, a wider variety of question presentations and the ability to run through a web browser.





It was first modified from Egonet and used to collect egocentric data on a study of HIV risk among heterosexual homeless men (R01HD059307; Suzanne Wenzel PI). EgoWeb development was led by a team of researchers, including David Kennedy, Hank Green, Ryan Brown, and Sam Wertheimer. Programming was conducted by Eric Lavigne and Cambridge Web Design. In June 2010, EgoWeb was installed on laptops and used to collect over 300 egocentric interviews with homeless men recruited at meal lines in Los Angeles’ Skid Row.



EgoWeb was next used in Uganda (R21 MH8729; Wagner PI) to identify HIV-positive individuals at risk for being stigmatized and to develop interventions to help them cope effectively with stigma during treatment. The study also contributed to egocentric network methods development through a comparison of participants’ perceptions with alters’ reports and found support for the validity and accuracy of personal network measures, including participants’ perceptions of alters’ serostatus.





EgoWeb was used measure longitudinal social networks to track the spread of HIV-related mistrust through HIV-positive African Americans’ networks and their networks’ influence on treatment behaviors (R01 MD003964; Bogart PI).





In 2014, researchers on the UCLA RISE-UP project collaboratively developed EgoWeb 2.0, a PHP-based webserver application to facilitate interviewer-assisted interviews using iPads tablets and respondent-driven surveys over the web with email recruitment invitations. Researchers have continued to enhance EgoWeb 2.0 to enable collection of data on Android tablets and local installations on laptop computers.



The initial version of EgoWeb, which, like EgoNet, was a java application capable of being run on a laptop to collect data in field settings, was more extensively developed across several large sample studies of social networks, Substance Use, and sexual risk behavior among high school students (RC2MD004770, R01DA033362; Wong PI and R01DA033280; Green PI). These projects enabled the improvement of the EgoWeb database, interviewing performance, and user interface; improved webserver capabilities; offline mobile data collection with iPads; and whole network capabilities.




Initial funding for EgoNet came from the Florida Biomedical Research Foundation on a grant titled, "A Web-based Egocentric Network Tool for Visualizing Social Influences on Smoking Behavior". Christopher Mccarty was the PI of the grant.